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Breaking with Tradition

Breaking with Tradition

Weddings have changed dramatically over the years. For example, the "traditional" white bridal gown only dates from the Victorian age.

The bride throwing her wedding bouquet is reported to stem from a custom whereby female guests would tear shreds from the bride's dress to keep as a kind of fertility charm (oh the horror)! It wasn't so long ago that wedding guests could expect a traditional white wedding: a church service, the Wedding March, the "love, honour and obey" vows. But in the 21st Century it seems anything goes. If you're planning a wedding today you're probably relying much less on tradition and much more on your own personalities and shared interests. It's not uncommon to hear of ceremonies involving bungee-jumping, brides who opt for a little black dress instead of a long white gown, all-male bridesmaids, and brides who dance down a yellow brick road aisle as Rock Me Amadeus is hammered out on the church organ (okay, I made that last one up). Whilst there may be, let us say, more mature members of the wedding party tutting beneath their hats, in general these non-traditional ceremonies are seen as apt celebrations of the union of two unique and well-rounded human beings. Your big day reflects who you are - both as individuals and as a couple.

Similarly, your choice of wedding rings isn't restricted to whether you want 9 or 18 carat gold. You'll be wearing your rings for much, much longer than just your wedding day so choosing ones that suit you - not just aesthetically but personally - is just as important as choosing the venue where you'll exchange them. Gold, white gold, platinum or palladium; plain, patterned, engraved or diamond studded; ultra-light narrow bands or heavy metal inch-wide cuffs: these are just some of the ways you can customise your wedding rings to make them truly yours. Like your plans for the special day itself, the only things that will limit you are your imagination and your bank balance - unless, of course, you're having one of those traditional weddings where the bride's parents pay for everything...