Texture bg1

Ethically Sourced Diamonds

Ethically Sourced Diamonds

Blood Diamonds (also called conflict diamonds or war diamonds or hot diamonds) is a term used for a diamond mined in a war zone and sold to finance insurgency, an invading army’s war efforts, or a warlord’s activity.

Conflict diamonds captured the world’s attention during the extremely brutal conflict in Sierra Leone in the late 1990s. During this time, it is estimated that conflict diamonds represented approximately 4% of the world’s diamond production.

In July 2000, the global diamond industry made clear to the international community its zero tolerance policy towards conflict diamonds. Dedicated to eradicating the trade in conflict diamonds, it worked closely with the United Nations, governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) such as Global Witness and Partnership Africa Canada to create the Kimberley Process Certification System. This system was formally adopted in 2003 and guards against conflict diamonds entering the legitimate diamond supply chain. The diamond industry also adopted a voluntary System of Warranties to assure consumers that their diamonds are from sources free of conflict.

All the diamonds sold by Quality Diamonds have been obtained from suppliers working within the Kimberley Process scheme. We do not buy diamonds from any source which cannot prove the rough stone has been cut by a participant of the Kimberley Process.

But Ethical Diamonds go one step further than this. We all know diamonds are brilliant at looking beautiful and putting smiles on the faces of people we love.  But did you also know they help to educate children, provide healthcare and fight HIV/AIDs?

By enabling more diamonds to be sold legally, the UN-mandated Kimberley Process has resulted in greater revenues for the governments of developing countries, which in turn has improved conditions for millions of people. According to diamondfacts.org, an estimated 65% of the world's diamonds, worth approximately $8.4 billion a year, is sourced in African countries.

Here are just some of the ways diamonds have helped to make the world a better place:

  • An estimated 5 million people have access to appropriate healthcare globally thanks to revenues from diamonds.

  • Diamond revenues enable every child in Botswana to receive free education up to the age of 13.

  • Approximately one million people are employed by the diamond industry in India.

  • Thousands of African students benefit from education initiatives in diamond producing countries supported by the Diamond Empowerment Fund.

  • The revenue from diamonds is instrumental in the fight against the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Visit diamondfacts.org and diamondempowerment.org for more feel good diamond stories.